Maxine Redd Frost
Jan 04, 2012 | 1230 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print

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October 8, 1918 ~ December 31, 2011

Maxine Redd Frost was born in Blanding, UT on October 8, 1918, to L Frank and Nettie Rose Redd. Maxine weighed in at 3 lbs, “no bigger than a quart fruit jar.”

She was the oldest of seven children, and proved to be as good and clever as she was tiny.

She excelled on the piano, and at the age of 12 she became the Primary accompanist, and later the Ward Organist, a calling which she held for more than 70 years.

An excellent student, Maxine graduated from Monticello High School at age 16, and attended Utah State Agricultural College for a short time. She became secretary for the Farmer’s Home Security when she returned home to Monticello and began a courtship with a handsome young farmer, recently returned from the Western States Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Maxine Redd and Clarence Alfred Frost were married on October 15, 1940, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple.

Maxine and Alfred were blessed with six children: Teresa Guymon, of Orem, UT; Jeffrey Alfred (Denise) of Monticello; Jane (Conrad) Taysom of Loveland, CO; Baby Rae, who died at birth; Spencer Hardison (Jayne) of Monticello; and Dan Sterling (Nancy) of Eagle, ID.

Maxine raised an outstanding family as she and Alfred made their living farming in the Monticello area. Maxine was a great manager and cared for her family in many ways, sewing even their underwear and winter coats!

She was an excellent cook. Everyone loved her Christmas egg casserole with green chiles. She was a stickler for correct spelling and grammar—if you didn’t get it right, she would let you know! She raised a huge garden, canned, and kept a beautiful yard. She served capably as both Ward and Stake Relief Society President, and then as President of the Stake Young Women’s MIA.

After her children were all in school, Maxine went to work as secretary for the San Juan School District and later as manager of the Southeast Utah Title Company, Monticello Office. She was well-known for her competence in searching out titles to mineral and oil rights.

Maxine was a wonderful wife, mother, and career woman, but those who know her best agree that what they loved most about her was her kind and generous nature. She had that rare ability to hold back judgment and extend compassion. She was liberal with invitations to dinner, to stay the night, to share her home. She gave quietly, without fanfare. She was never critical, belittling, or overbearing. Her family and friends loved her dry wit and intelligent conversation. It was a great treat to sit next to her at any function, church or community, because she would have you chuckling your way through it. She was easy to love because she loved so easily.

Maxine passed away peacefully on New Year’s Eve at the home of Dan and Nancy Frost in Eagle, ID. For the past three years she has been compassionately cared for by each of her children in turn. At her death she was surrounded by sons, daughters, daughters-in-law, and grandchildren. The family thanks Dan and Nancy for their tender care these past few weeks. Maxine will be missed. She was truly a remarkable woman.

Maxine is survived by three sisters: Helen Klaire Binder, of Alderly Edge, Chesire, England; Lucy Redd, of Bountiful, UT; and Marilyn Rowley of Monticello. She is survived by five children, 28 grandchildren, and 47 great-grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her loving husband, Clarence Alfred Frost.

Funeral services are Saturday, January 7, at noon in the Monticello North LDS Chapel. A viewing will be held from 9 to 11 a.m. Maxine will be interred in the Monticello Cemetery.
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