Two local legends inducted into the Utah Cowboy Hall of Fame
Oct 04, 2016 | 11035 views | 0 0 comments | 362 362 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Charles and Annaley Redd at the Hole in the Rock on the Colorado River in 1940.  Photo courtesy Charlie and Annaley Redd Collection, San Juan County Historical Commission
Charles and Annaley Redd at the Hole in the Rock on the Colorado River in 1940. Photo courtesy Charlie and Annaley Redd Collection, San Juan County Historical Commission
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Al Scorup on Old Bugger at the ranch headquarters at Indian Creek in 1934.  Courtesy photo
Al Scorup on Old Bugger at the ranch headquarters at Indian Creek in 1934. Courtesy photo
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Two San Juan County legends were recently inducted into the Utah Cowboy Hall of Fame on July 8, 2016. Charles Redd and John Albert Scorup were inducted in the first class of emeritus members of the Hall of Fame.

Charles Redd

Charles Redd operated large ranching operations throughout San Juan County and southwest Colorado. He was born in Bluff to Lemuel H. Redd, Jr. in a log cabin with a dirt roof and a dirt floor.

A biography from the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University states, “His education in the school of hard knocks was complemented by formal training in a one-room school. In that environment he soon showed himself to be a natural-born leader.

“On completion of his training in the lower grades, Charlie’s parents decided to send him over 300 miles away to Provo to Brigham Young Academy, where he enrolled in high school.

“He was known as a “leader and a pusher,” participating in every activity from school plays to baseball. And in the meantime he was learning the routines of ranching in San Juan.

“After serving a Northwestern States Mission for the LDS Church, in 1914 he became manager of the La Sal Livestock Company, which later was known as Redd Ranches.

“Mr. Redd has won wide recognition for his application of scientific knowledge to livestock breeding and range improvement. He insisted that his livestock be more productive and efficient and well-adapted to the often dry and rough ranges in Southeastern Utah.

“Through extensive brush eradication and grass planting, Mr. Redd increased the capacity 10 times of some of his rangeland. In 1946, the Record Stockman Magazine selected him as “Man of the Year in Livestock.”

“Charles Redd served as Trustee of Utah State University as Chairman of the Utah Water and Power Board and in the Utah State Legislature. He was director of the Cowboy Hall of Fame, the Utah Historical Heritage Foundation, Utah Power and Light and Amalgamated Sugar. 

“He was awarded the Honorary Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II in recognition of his  “long years of business and social contact in the interest of fostering Anglo-American friendship.”

“Charles Redd married Annaley Naegle in 1931 and they were the parents of nine children.  He passed away in 1975.”

Redd helped establish the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University, which is the academic home of the Lemuel H. Redd Chair in Western History.

Al Scorup

Albert Scorup was a ranching legend throughout southern Utah. A native of Salina, UT, Scorup came to San Juan County as a young man in 1891, soon after the original settlers arrived. For the next 68 years, until his death in 1959, Scorup’s name became synonymous with the cattle industry in southern Utah.

Al Scorup headquartered his expansive ranching operations in San Juan County, with his family removed from the day-to-day ranch operations in a beautiful home in Bluff. The family, which included six daughters, eventually moved to Provo for the good schools there.

Scorup began operations in the White Canyon and Wooden Shoe areas and steadily expanded to the north. He briefly sold his operation in White Canyon to Jacob Adams and returned to the Salina area.

However, Scorup returned to San Juan County shortly thereafter when the Indian Creek Cattle Company was put up for sale. He joined with Bill and Andrew Somerville and Jacob Adams to create the Scorup Somerville Cattle Company, with headquarters at the Dugout Ranch.

Scorup’s operation controlled all cattle grazing areas in western San Juan County, from Grand Gulch in the east to the Colorado River on the west and from the San Juan River on the south to Hatch Wash on the north.

Scorup is also honored as a member of the Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City, OK.

Other emeritus members of the Hall of Fame who were inducted this year are the Bronc Bustin’ Bascom Boys, including John W. Bascom, J. Raymond “Tommy” Basom, Melvin “High Pockets” Bascom, F. Weldon “Preacher” Bascom, and Earl W. Bascom.

Living members of the 2016 Hall of Fame class include Mary-Shaw Drake, Marvin Dunbar, Don Kennington, Norman “Shorty” Thompson, Ken Woolstenhulme, and Cody Wright.

The Hall of Fame is part of the Utah Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Ogden, UT. The Museum is always looking for contributions and donations of historical artifacts. It can be reached at PO Box 150092, Ogden, UT 84401.
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