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A graphic representation of San Juan County, designed by Jorrien and Tiera Peterson to reflect the unique landscapes of the county and what means the most to the residents within.   Courtesy photo
A graphic representation of San Juan County, designed by Jorrien and Tiera Peterson to reflect the unique landscapes of the county and what means the most to the residents within. Courtesy photo
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New graphic highlights diversity of San Juan
Sep 17, 2019 | 984 views | 0 0 comments | 518 518 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A graphic representation of San Juan County, designed by Jorrien and Tiera Peterson to reflect the unique landscapes of the county and what means the most to the residents within.	  Courtesy photo
A graphic representation of San Juan County, designed by Jorrien and Tiera Peterson to reflect the unique landscapes of the county and what means the most to the residents within. Courtesy photo
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by Alene Laney, Contributing writer The San Juan County Economic Development team commissioned a unique, graphic illustration of the county earlier this year.  The graphic was created by Jorrien and Tiera Peterson, a husband and wife team based out of Salt Lake City who are making a name with their simple, minimalistic approach to design. Jorrien Peterson described to the San Juan Record their process for illustrating meaningful graphics: “We create a sense of place in our work by trying to figure out what matters most to those that live in the region that we are illustrating. “In other words, the key to our success is research. Often times, it takes more time to research our projects than to illustrate them.”  The map was designed to reflect both the unique landscapes of the county and what means the most to the residents within. It incorporates history, natural landmarks, geological features, interests, and values of the people of San Juan County. It’s a fantastic representation of the vast landscape and people in this wild corner of the world.  Natalie Randall, San Juan County Economic Development Director, says, “We wanted something that was unique to the area that would incorporate familiar icons with visitors and locals alike.” The economic development team worked with the designers to identify the unique aspects and historical elements of the county to create the symbols in the map.  Jorrien Peterson continues, “In the case of the San Juan County map, we had huge help in that area from Natalie and Allison [Yamamoto-Sparks, of the San Juan County Economic Development team], who commissioned the project.  “We can spend all the time in the world researching online, but there is nothing quite like getting a locals perspective on the matter.” What’s also interesting about the map is how individual the experience is for each person that views it. Peterson explains it this way, “Something else that makes our work unique is the theory of 2+2=4. Some artists give a ‘4’ with their work, but we like to give ‘2+2.’ I think that it can be a much more rewarding and enjoyable process for the viewer if they have to work for it a little bit.”  “By taking recognizable landmarks and illustrating them in a minimal style, it makes them work just a little bit to figure out what each icon represents and why that icon has been placed in that particular spot. There’s nothing quite like watching someone’s face as they explore one of our maps for the first time.” The graphic will be incorporated into San Juan County’s branding, such as community guide books, travel guides, websites, etc. Interested residents and visitors should keep tabs on the economic development office social media channels, @utahscanyoncounty on Facebook and Instagram, for giveaways of the product they do have. The economic development office is still looking for the best way to sell merchandise with the graphic. 
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No government form question on 2019 ballot in Grand County
Sep 17, 2019 | 671 views | 0 0 comments | 506 506 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Significant portions of this article are taken from a Times Independent story by Doug McMurdo Voters in Grand County will not weigh in on a proposed new form of government in the November general election. The plan to put the issue on the ballot was dashed on September 5, when Grand County Attorney Christina Sloan determined that several provisions of the proposal may violate Utah statutes or the state and U.S. constitutions. In 2018, 70 percent of Grand County voters approved a ballot question that asked if a committee should be formed to recommend a new form of county government. After the election, a committee was formed. After months of work, the committee recommended that a five-member county council be put on the November ballot. With the decision by Sloan, the issue will not be on the upcoming ballot. The situation in Grand County is similar in many ways to the 2019 election in San Juan County, when voters will face a similar question to that asked of Grand County voters in 2018. If the majority of voters approve the ballot question, a committee similar to the Grand County committee will be formed in San Juan County. This committee will be asked to investigate a new form of county government, which would be placed on a subsequent ballot. After the decision was announced in Grand County, County Attorney Sloan faced both withering criticism and lavish praise when the Grand County Change in Form of Government Study Committee met to discuss her findings. In the end, the committee deemed all but one of her findings relatively minor. Sloan cited several statutes and a variety of case law in determining that the plan’s establishment of two voting districts, “…illegally usurps redistricting power that is reserved to the State Legislature in the Utah Constitution and delegated to the county council by Utah statute.” In other words, the responsibility for redistricting lies with the current council, according to Sloan – a contention virtually every member of the study committee vehemently disputed. In San Juan County, the question was put on the ballot after five county residents collected several hundred signatures from county residents. The signature route was taken only after the county commission declined a direct request to place the question on the ballot. According to the Times Independent, the ultimate question in Grand County may be which entity gets to control redistricting. In this case, it’s the question behind the question that matters: How much authority is vested in the study committee? Sloan sees the study committee as no more than an advisory committee, while members of the study committee believe their authority goes beyond an advisory capacity – with the only higher power in the hands of voters who would approve or reject the plan. Following Sloan’s decision, voters will vote yes or no on the optional plan in 2020, with the first elections in 2022. If they vote no, the form of government will automatically revert to a three-person commission, which means those three people would have executive and legislative control over county government, a form that was unpopular with residents who took the committee’s surveys.
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