Inaugural Monticello Ghost Tour is July 25
Jul 25, 2014 | 365 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The San Juan Record is pleased to introduce the first tour of its kind in San Juan County. The Monticello Ghost Tour will take place on Friday, July 25 beginning at Veterans Memorial Park in Monticello. The tour takes about 30 minutes, with the first tour set to depart at 7 p.m. near the Monticello City Office at 100 East and 100 North. Participants will be seated throughout the tour, which visits historic sites throughout the community and returns to its beginning point. New groups will leave every 45 minutes or so, until the ghosts or the guides are exhausted. Ghost tours can be found in many cities around the world. They are generally offered in areas of historic interest. “Ghost tours are a phenomenon,” said San Juan Record Editor Bill Boyle. “My family and I have attended a few, had a great time, and thought, ‘Why not have a ghost tour in Monticello?’” The Monticello Ghost Tour tour is light on ghosts and heavy on the fascinating history of the community. The script includes dozens of stories, both fun and poignant, about the early history of Monticello, the little town at the base of the Blue Mountains. “We need to give a disclaimer,” said Boyle. “We will be as suprised as anyone if an actual ghost appears on the tour... but you never know.” Cost for the tour is $5 per person or $25 for the entire immediate family. A few of the stories that will be told include the tragic death at Monticello’s first Pioneer Day celebration, Rambo holds the pharmacy hostage, the creative driving of George Adams, the old hanging tree, Marie Ogden and the Home of Truth, uranium triumph and tragedy, the Haunted Highland Hotel, and many more. Hear about Monticello’s heroic history, the cowboys and the Indians, the settlers and the renegades at the inaugural Monticello Ghost Tour on Friday, July 25.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Remodeling the Blanding South Chapel–again
Ben F. Redd was the main carpenter during the construction of the Grayson/Blanding Tabernacle. The heavy pine lumber—no pieces smaller than 2x6 and some as long as 20’—came from the local sawmill. The thousands of bricks for the building were all hand molded and fired by Benjamin D. Black and sons. The mortar was made from lime that came from “west of Pine Nut Knoll” (the knoll with the ‘SJ” on it) and the “sharp” sand they needed came from Westwater. The hard sandstone was also quarried from Westwater by George Arthur Hurst, Sr. He used hand tools to cut out rock slabs 1-3 feet thick and up to 100 feet long. The hand hewn ornamental rock was shaped by professional stonecutters John Tuscher and his sons, Fred and Godfrey.  They were brought in by J.B. Harris’s relative, Henry Ashton, who was an engineer/ building contractor and became the foreman of the building project. George Hurst, Jr. wrote, “It seemed like every time there was sufficient need, somebody showed up who had the ability or training to do the thing required in order to continue the construction of that building.”
view slideshow (14 images)
Located at the top of the north end of the original structure, these old wooden louvers will be replaced.  It was concern over the condition of the roof that began the current remodeling process.  Though the chapel won’t be returned to its original design, the improvements being made will deliver the building into its next century in good condition.
Located at the top of the north end of the original structure, these old wooden louvers will be replaced. It was concern over the condition of the roof that began the current remodeling process. Though the chapel won’t be returned to its original design, the improvements being made will deliver the building into its next century in good condition.
slideshow
This is what the Relief Society room presently looks like. Obviously, it will hold a few of the “surprises”.  Another change that shouldn’t be a surprise is that all of the old creaky radiators and noisy air conditioners have been removed.  The building will maintain its pioneer spirit while providing every modern comfort.
This is what the Relief Society room presently looks like. Obviously, it will hold a few of the “surprises”. Another change that shouldn’t be a surprise is that all of the old creaky radiators and noisy air conditioners have been removed. The building will maintain its pioneer spirit while providing every modern comfort.
slideshow
The San Juan Record welcomes comments on our stories. Please be civil, respectful, focused and humane. Postings are not edited and are the responsibility of the author. You agree not to post comments that are abusive, threatening or obscene. Postings may be removed at the discretion of sjrnews.com